Prayer

There are several disciplines in the Christian life. One of them is prayer. We believe everyone can pray anytime about anything. On this page we will be providing helps and tips to start a prayer life or to strengthen the one you have.

Here is an option for Morning Prayer

Liturgies for Holy Week

The links provided are for you to use. They are the services/liturgies for this holy week. Use as many or as few as you like. And if you have any questions do not hesitate to email Pastor Bianca at belliott at greatplainsumc.org. Blessings. 

https://www.ministrymatters.com/all/entry/10236/home-worship-for-maundy-thursday-good-friday-and-easter-vigil-simplified

And this is for you to have daily prayer. One is for the morning and one is for the evening. There are other services such as for noontime and before you go to sleep (compline). Let me know if you need those. 

https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/book-of-worship/an-order-for-morning-praise-and-prayer

Blessings to you and yours. 

Here is a blog from the Upper Room organization that helps you to create a place for prayer and devotions.

How to Have a Daily Devotional Time

Daily Devotional Time

by Mary Lou Redding

The phrases “doing devotions” or “having devotions” may sound foreign or weird. These phrases are simply ways people describe spending time with God by reading the Bible (and other Christian literature) and praying. Why bother to read the Bible and pray? Why is having a regular time with God important? We spend time with God in order to deepen and strengthen our relationship with the One who created us and yearns to be with us.

But because we are all different and because each of us has a unique relationship with God, no one devotional pattern will work for everyone. And no one way works for anyone all of the time. Experiment until you find the time of day, content, and length of time spent that helps you feel connected with God.

BASIC PATTERN

  • Begin your devotional time by quieting yourself. Take a few deep breaths and become still. Some people light a candle or say a simple prayer such as, “O God, open my heart to hear your message to me in the words I read.”
  • Then read a short passage in the Bible and some additional reading. A resource such as The Upper Room or Disciplines can guide you in choosing scripture passages, and its witness from other believers can help you connect the words of the Bible with concerns of everyday life.
  • At the end of your reading time, be silent and wait to see what words, feelings, or images rise in your heart or tug at your thoughts. Notice what situations or people come to mind.
  • Consider how the words or images connect with your life; then pray and ask the Holy Spirit to help you to see what God may be saying to you through what you have read, thought, and felt.
  • Say a prayer, asking God to help you follow the guidance you have received and to be with the people who came to mind during your reading and reflection.

You may want to record your thoughts and feelings in a notebook or journal, to help you remember what God has been saying to you. Many people find it helpful to write about concerns and to write a prayer as a way to end their devotional time.

If you are just beginning to take time for reading the Bible and praying, plan to spend about ten minutes. As you become more comfortable with the process, you may find yourself spending a longer time.

OTHER IDEAS TO HELP YOU

  • Start small. Use a resource such as The Upper Room or Disciplines that provides short, daily readings and guides you to look at small portions of scripture. Don’t start off planning to spend 30 or 45 minutes.
  • Keep it manageable. Don’t set impossible goals such as reading an entire chapter of the Bible three times a day, every day. Choose a discipline that you can stick with.
  • Look for help. If you are unfamiliar with the Bible, put a bookmark in the contents page of the Bible you use so you can turn there to find where each book begins. This will save time and help you avoid frustrated searching for a particular reading. If you need help finding something to read that “speaks” to you, ask people at church for suggestions of what they have found helpful.
  • Find a spiritual “buddy.” Ask a friend, co-worker, or someone at church to become your devotions partner. Then, each day, call or e-mail one another to discuss what you have read and what connections you make between the reading and your concerns.
  • Remember the value of having a pattern. Finding a regular time and place to read the Bible and the day’s meditation in The Upper Room or Disciplines helps most people be more consistent in turning their hearts to God. Regularity can become a rhythm that comforts, and having a familiar time and place may help you to settle into God’s presence more easily.
  • Remember the value of being flexible. Doing exactly the same things in the same way can become stale over time. If events in your day interfere with your usual pattern, find another time to read and reflect, or turn your mind to God by singing a Christian song. Don’t let a pattern control you and cause you discomfort. The point is to spend time with God, not to do this in a particular way.
  • Be creative. Try something new from time to time. Here are some possibilities: Read your meditation outside. Write your prayers in a journal. Take a “prayer walk” with the intent of looking for God, and pray in response to the people and situations that come to mind as you walk. Listen to Christian music and talk to God about what it brings to mind.

The most important thing to remember as we try to grow closer to God is that God is already reaching out to us. God is the one who gives us the desire to grow, and God wants us to grow. We just keep showing up, even when we don’t particularly feel holy or loving or eager. And we can trust that if we do so, God will show up, too.

________________________________________

Mary Lou Redding is the former Editorial Director of The Upper Room magazine and author of the books The Power of a Focused HeartWhile We WaitBreaking and Mending, and The Lord’s Prayer.

And here you will find prayers to start you off on your daily prayers. If you would like additional help be sure to watch for updates to this page and/or email Pastor Bianca at belliott at greatplainsumc.org.

A Guide to Daily Prayer

Wheat

These prayers imply worship time with a group; feel free to adapt the plural pronouns for personal use.

Morning Prayer

“In the morning, O Lord, you hear my voice;
in the morning I lay my requests before you
and wait in expectation.”—Psalm 5:3

Gathering and Silence

Call to Praise and Prayer

God said: Let there be light; and there was light.
And God saw that the light was good.

Psalm 63:2-6

God, my God, you I crave;
my soul thirsts for you,
my body aches for you
like a dry and weary land.
Let me gaze on you in your temple:
a Vision of strength and glory
Your love is better than life,
my speech is full of praise.
I give you a lifetime of worship,
my hands raised in your name.
I feast at a rich table
my lips sing of your glory.

Prayer of Thanksgiving

We praise you with joy, loving God, for your grace is better than life itself. You have sustained us through the darkness: and you bless us with life in this new day. In the shadow of your wings we sing for joy and bless your holy name. Amen.

Scripture Reading

Silence

Prayers of the People

The Lord’s Prayer (see Midday Prayer for The Lord’s Prayer)

Blessing

May the light of your mercy shine brightly on all who walk in your presence today, O Lord.

Midday Prayer

“I will extol the Lord at all times;
God’s praise will always be on my lips.”—Psalm 34:1

Gathering and Silence

Call to Praise and Prayer

O Lord, my Savior, teach me your ways.
My hope is in you all day long.

Prayer of Thanksgiving

God of mercy, we acknowledge this midday pause of refreshment as one of your many generous gifts. Look kindly upon our work this day; may it be made perfect in your time. May our purpose and prayers be pleasing to you. This we ask through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Scripture Reading

Silence

Prayers of the People

The Lord’s Prayer (ecumenical text)

Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins as we forgive
those who sin against us.
Save us from the time of trial,
and deliver us from evil.
For the kingdom, the power, and the glory
are yours, now and forever. Amen.

Blessing

Strong is the love embracing us, faithful the Lord from morning to night.

Evening Prayer

“My soul finds rest in God alone;
my salvation comes from God.”—Psalm 62:1

Gathering and Silence

Call to Praise and Prayer

From the rising of the sun to its setting,
let the name of the Lord be praised.

Psalm 134

Bless the Lord,
all who serve in God’s house,
who stand watch
throughout the night.
Lift up your hands
in the holy place
and bless the Lord.
And may God,
the maker of earth and sky, bless you from Zion.

Prayer of Thanksgiving

Sovereign God, you have been our help during the day and you promise to be with us at night. Receive this prayer as a sign of our trust in you. Save us from all evil, keep us from all harm, and guide us in your way. We belong to you, Lord. Protect us by the power of your name, in Jesus Christ we pray. Amen.

Scripture Reading

Silence

Prayers of the People

The Lord’s Prayer (see Midday Prayer for The Lord’s Prayer)

Blessing

May your unfailing love rest upon us, O Lord,
even as we hope in you.

This Guide to Daily Prayer was compiled from scripture and other resources by Rueben P. Job and then adapted by the Pathways Center for Spiritual Leadership while under the direction of Marjorie J. Thompson.


Source: The Upper Room Disciplines 

The Upper Room Disciplines follows a daily rhythm of scripture reading, devotion, and prayer. Based on scripture passages from the Revised Common Lectionary,Disciplines invites readers to engage more deeply with the Bible by reading daily devotions developed around a weekly theme.

Disciplines offers devotions from a variety of perspectives by featuring clergy and lay writers from many Christian denominations and from across the US and beyond.

Designed for individual or small-group use, Disciplines helps readers approach biblical stories afresh through others’ reflections and prayers. Weekly scripture overviews help readers get started with the week’s readings, and reflection questions invite readers to apply the texts and the devotions to their own lives. 

Join the Disciplines community by starting your own small group or by commenting on each day’s devotion on the website or mobile app.